Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Future Tenses in English Grammar

4. Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Future Perfect Continuous Tense or Future Perfect Progressive Tense represents an action that will start in future and continue till a certain time in future.   
Rules:  
  1. Use 1st form of Verb plus ‘ing’.  
  2. Use ‘shall have been’ for I and we while ‘will have been’ for all other singular or plural subjects (like you, he, she, it, they, etc.). This rule is reversed to emphasize things.  
  3. 2nd and 3rd forms of ‘will/shall’ are ‘would’.   
  4.  Grammar experts, now-a-days, mostly allow the use of ‘will’ for all subjects.  
  5. Use W/H-word (Who, What, Why, Where, When, Whom, Which, Whose, How) in the beginning of an interrogative sentence. 
  6. If you encounter non-action verbs (look, know, to be, taste, seem, feel, etc.) in Future Perfect Continuous Tense, give them the form of Future Perfect Tense. 
  7. Use the words ‘Since’ and ‘For’ with great care in the following way: 
— For is used for a period or duration of time like 25 minutes, 30 weeks, 2 days, 5 years, 5 centuries, ages, etc.  
— Since represents a specific or fixed starting time like Monday, Morning, noon, midnight, May, 2020, 3 a.m., 4 o’clock (4 of the clock), etc. 
 

a) Affirmative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Structure: 

Subject → Shall Have/Will Have → Been → 1st form of Verb (V1+ing) → Object → For/Since → Time/Duration. 
Examples: 
  1. She will have been washing her clothes since January. 
  2. Tess will have been cooking the meal for 2 hours. 
  3. We shall have been guiding her to lead a calm life 
  4. They will have been playing on piano before she joins them.  
  5. You will have been playing tennis before you go there.  
  6. They will have been feeling headache for 2 weeks. (Sentence is wrong as ‘feeling’ is a non-action verb) 
  7. They will have felt pain for two weeks. (Correct)  
  8. We shall have been looking at him since morning. (Sentence is wrong as ‘looking’ is a non-action verb) 
  9. We shall have looked at him since morning. (Correct) 

b) Negative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Structure: 

Subject → Shall/Will → Not → Have → Been → 1st form of Verb (V1+ing) → Object → For/Since → Time/Duration. 
Examples: 
  1. She will not have been washing her clothes since January. 
  2. Tess will not have been cooking the meal for 2 hours. 
  3. We shall not have been entertaining her to stay calm.  
  4. They will not have been playing on piano before she joins them.  
  5. You will not have been playing tennis before you go there.  
  6. They will not have felt pain for two weeks.   
  7. We shall not have looked at him since morning. 

c) Interrogative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Structure: 

Shall/Will → Subject → Have → Been → 1st form of Verb (V1+ing) → Object → For/Since → Time/Duration. 
Examples: 
  1. Will she have been washing her clothes since January? 
  2. Will Tess have been cooking the meal for 2 hours? 
  3. Shall we have been entertaining her for 3 hours to stay calm?  
  4. Will they have been playing on the piano before she joins them?  
  5. Will you have been playing tennis before you go there?  
  6. Will they have felt pain for two weeks?   
  7. Shall we have looked at him since morning? 
 

d) Interrogatives-cum-W/H-words in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Structure: 

W/H-word → Shall/Will → Subject → Have → Been → 1st form of Verb (V1+ing) → Object → For/Since → Time/Duration. 
Examples: 
  1. Where will she have been washing her clothes since January? 
  2. Why will Tess have been cooking the meal for 2 hours? 
  3. How shall we have been entertaining her for 3 hours to stay calm?  
  4. When will they have been playing on piano before she joins them?  
  5. Where will you have been playing tennis before you go there?  
  6. Why will they have felt pain for two weeks?   
 

e) Interrogative-cum-Negative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Structure: 

W/H-word → Shall/Will → Subject → Not → Have → Been → 1st form of Verb (V1+ing) → Object → For/Since → Time/Duration. 
Examples: 
  1. Where will she not have been washing her clothes since January? 
  2. Why will Tess not have been cooking the meal for 2 hours? 
  3. Why shall we not have been entertaining her for 3 hours to stay calm?  
  4. Why will they not have been playing on piano before she joins them?  
  5. Where will you not have been playing tennis before you go there?  
  6. Why will they not have felt pain for two weeks?   

Also Visit

Six (6) Progressive Tenses in English Language 
Four (4) Past-cum-Future Tenses in English Language 
Twelve (12) Tenses in English Language 

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Affirmative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar 

Sat Mar 28 , 2020
Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar  a) Affirmative in Future Perfect Continuous Tense in English Grammar  Structure:  Subject → […]

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